RCE Scotland - 2019

Bulding a Good Food Nation
Basic Information
Title of project : 
Bulding a Good Food Nation
Submitting RCE: 
RCE Scotland
Contributing organization(s) : 
Learning for Sustainability Scotland; representing 650 member organisations.
Focal point(s) and affiliation(s)
Name: 
Kirsten Leask
Organizational Affiliation: 
Learning for Sustainability Scotland (c/o University of Edinburgh)
Format of project: 
PowerPoint
Language of project: 
English
Date of submission:
Friday, May 31, 2019
Becoming a Good Food Nation
At what level is the policy operating?: 
Subnational
Scottish Government's National Performance Framework
At what level is the policy operating?: 
Subnational
Geographical & Education Information
Region: 
Europe
Country: 
United Kingdom
Location(s): 
Scotland
Address of focal point institution for project: 
Moray House School of Education
Room 1.17 Charteris Land
University of Edinburgh
Holyrood Road
Edinburgh
EH8 8AQ
Level of Education for intended audience:

Multiple sectors
Socioeconomic and environmental characteristics of the area : 
Scotland is a land of contrasts. Within a relatively small landmass (approx. 80,000 square kilometres), it contains all of the above ecosystems. Whilst 98% of Scotland is classed as ‘rural’, 83% of our population of 5 million live in our urban areas. Our towns and cities contain a wide range of socio-economic successes and challenges; with approximately 19% of our population living in poverty. More details here: https://www.gov.scot/publications/poverty-income-inequality-scotland-2014-17/pages/4/

Description of sustainable development challenge(s) in the area the project addresses: 
As a nation, Scotland recognises that food and food production provides opportunities for widespread and impactful economic, social and ecological improvements across all sectors of society. Food production and export is one of Scotland’s key economic outputs: with approximately 1 in 5 Scots being employed in the food and drink industry. Indeed, between 2008 and 2011, it saw the strongest growth of all growth sectors in Scotland.
Food production and consumption poses huge challenges, however, across all nations; which directly impact on all 17 SDGs. In Scotland, we face serious challenges relating to dietary-related health & wellbeing; disengagement within the Scottish population as to where food comes from; threats to food security, due in part to climate change and a reliance on imports; and a lack of diversity and resilience in our supply chains, with the majority of our food system controlled by a handful of very large corporate retailers.
The publication of the Scottish Government’s ‘Becoming a Good Food Nation’ proposals in 2014 outlined a strategy for making ‘good’ food ( i.e. food that is good for Scottish society, economy and environment) part of everyday life for Scots by 2025.

Momentum has been sustained since 2014 through the Scottish Government’s realignment of its National Performance Framework against the SDGs and its recent recognition of the global climate emergency.
Food-specific activity has been evident in the work of the Scottish Government-appointed Scottish Food Commission and the third-sector-led Food Coalition. RCE Scotland has responded to the recent consultation on the Good Food Nation strategy, and a member of its Steering Group is engaging with the recently-created Good Food Nation Ambassador Network. Many of our members are directly or indirectly involved in work relating to food production and consumption.
Contents
Status: 
Ongoing
Rationale: 
Food is at the heart of human existence. Scotland’s rich larder and diverse cultural food history provides a wealth of opportunities, but our relationship with food has created serious health-related, societal, economic and environmental issues. The Scottish Government’s ‘Becoming a Good Food Nation’ proposal, and RCE Scotland’s food-related activity are seeking to address some of these challenges.
Objectives: 
• Responding to Good Food Nation policy consultations on behalf of our members.
• Embedding food-related activity relating to the SDGs within our practice and procedures
• Active engagement with communities and learners through national networks.
Activities and/or practices employed: 
• Provision of a response on behalf of our members to the Good Food Nation strategy consultation
• Embedding the SDGs as seen through a ‘food lens’ across many of our professional learning offerings to all educational sectors
• Ensuring our own practice and procedures as an RCE are compatible with the vision of a ‘Good Food Nation’.
• Active participation in local and national community engagement through the Good Food Ambassador network
Size of academic audience: 
Ongoing
Results: 
Ongoing
Lessons learned: 
Ongoing
Key messages: 
The production and consumption of good food; i.e. food that’s good for the physical and mental well-being of society, the environment and the economy, is at the heart of human existence and a key challenge of our time. Scotland’s move towards becoming a Good Food Nation seeks to address some of the fundamental challenges faced by our planet at a local level.
Relationship to other RCE activities: 
Membership of Scotland SDG Network and UK Stakeholders for Sustainable Development Network (UKSSD)
Funding: 
Activity of contributing member organisations.

Pictures:

File Name Caption for picture Photo Credit
Image icon Becoming a Good Food Nation.jpg (10.92 KB) Becoming a Good Food Nation: Scotland's vision for 2025 Scottish Government
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
(https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) and other themes of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)
SDG 1 - End poverty in all its forms everywhere 
Indirect
SDG 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 
Direct
SDG 3 - Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages 
Direct
SDG 4 - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 
Indirect
SDG 5 - Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 
Indirect
SDG 6 - Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 
Indirect
SDG 7 - Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 
Indirect
SDG 8 - Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all 
Direct
SDG 9 - Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation, and foster innovation 
Indirect
SDG 10 - Reduce inequality within and among countries 
Indirect
SDG 11 - Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 
Indirect
SDG 12 - Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 
Direct
SDG 13 - Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 
Indirect
SDG 14 - Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 
Indirect
SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss 
Indirect
SDG 16 - Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 
Indirect
SDG 17 - Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development 
Indirect
Theme
Disaster Risk Reduction 
Direct
Traditional Knowledge  
Direct
Agriculture 
Direct
Curriculum Development 
Direct
Ecotourism 
Direct
Forests/Trees 
Indirect
Plants & Animals 
Indirect
Waste 
Direct
Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development – Priority Action Areas
Priority Action Area 1 - Advancing policy 
Direct
Priority Action Area 3 - Building capacities of educators and trainers 
Direct
Priority Action Area 4 - Empowering and mobilizing youth 
Indirect