RCE Penang - 2022

EMPOWERING COMMUNITY ON SUSTAINABILITY OF MANGROVE ECOSYSTEM
Basic Information
Title of project : 
EMPOWERING COMMUNITY ON SUSTAINABILITY OF MANGROVE ECOSYSTEM
Submitting RCE: 
RCE Penang
Contributing organization(s) : 
RCE PENANG
CENTRE FOR GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES, USM
SCHOOL OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES, USM
RCE SEJAHTERA YOUTH (RCE PENANG)
PUNCAK MERBOK EDUCATION & WELFARE CLUB
PRIMARY SCHOOL HAJI OMAR TAHIR
KUALA MUDA / YAN DISTRICT EDUCATION OFFICE
Focal point(s) and affiliation(s)
Name: 
Dr. Japareng Lalung
Organizational Affiliation: 
RCE Penang
Name: 
Wan Sharipahmira Mohd Zain
Organizational Affiliation: 
Centre for Global Sustainability Studies, USM
Name: 
Nur Syazwana Hamzah
Organizational Affiliation: 
Centre for Global Sustainability Studies, USM
Name: 
Dr. Rabiatul-Adawiah Ahmad Rashid
Organizational Affiliation: 
School of Educational Studies, USM
Name: 
Mr Takuji Arai
Organizational Affiliation: 
Japan-Malaysia Association
Name: 
Mr. Ridzwan Ishak
Organizational Affiliation: 
Mr. Ridzwan Ishak
Name: 
Mr. Shahbudin Abu
Organizational Affiliation: 
Primary School Haji Omar Tahir
Name: 
Mr. Ahmad Akibi b Abdullah
Organizational Affiliation: 
Kuala Muda / Yan District Education Office
Format of project: 
Report, PowerPoint, Module
Language of project: 
English
Date of submission:
Thursday, September 8, 2022
Securing The Future of Mangrove https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000219248
At what level is the policy operating?: 
International
Geographical & Education Information
Region: 
Asia-Pacific
Country: 
Malaysia
Location(s): 
Tiram Sungai Merbok, Kedah
Address of focal point institution for project: 
RCE Penang
Centre for Global Sustainability Studies
Level 5, Hamzah Sendut Library
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Ecosystem(s):
Socioeconomic and environmental characteristics of the area : 
Merbok Forest Reserve is located about 1-hour drive north of Penang. Merbok F.R., made up of 18 compartments with a total area of 4,176 ha, is under the jurisdiction of the Kedah Forestry Department.

Merbok F.R. consists of 32 species of trees exclusive to the mangrove ecosystem and has been considered one of the most floristically diverse mangrove sites. The FR also harbours a diverse array of fauna. The most prominent is its bird communities, where about 80 species have been recorded, including migratory species. Other inhabitants include several species of primates, reptiles, and many commercially important aquatic species occupying the estuarine river ecosystem.

In the area, the mangrove and river ecosystems play an important role in providing a livelihood for fishermen and the surrounding village communities. Some of the villagers and fishermen comprise low-income households. However, some parts of mangrove forests have been degrading in the effect of urbanisation and development in the area and it has been big concern on sustainability of ecosystem and biodiversity in the future.
Description of sustainable development challenge(s) in the area the project addresses: 
The SDGs affected in this project are SDG 15 and SDG 15. The mangrove swamps have already been lost at a fast rate due to deforestation. These losses are the loss of rich biodiversity that mangrove harbours. As human activities around mangroves increase, more and more mangrove forest lands are lost due to threats from land clearance and conversions to aquaculture ponds, agriculture, industries, urbanisation, pollution, coastal development and others

Contents
Status: 
Ongoing
Period: 
June, 2018 to March, 2023
Rationale: 
In Malaysia and other tropical countries, the values and richness of the mangrove resources are critical. Mangroves are highly productive and play multiple ecological functions - they provide environmental benefits, and the resources derived support people in unique ways that contribute to their well-being. To humans, these are known as ecosystem goods and services which can be a wide variety of direct or non-direct provisions such as food, shelter, and livelihoods that we benefit from. Considering the life-support function of mangrove ecosystems for many species, their high productivity and their important position within the broader seascape, it is clear that the loss of mangrove forest can have far reaching consequences, not only for biodiversity but also to humans.
Objectives: 
To understand the ecological relationship in the mangrove ecosystem
To examine the current threats of mangrove
To value mangrove ecosystems and their services
To empower the community to take action through mangrove activities (hands-on, minds-on, hearts-on)
Activities and/or practices employed: 
Establishment of mangrove nursery
Mangrove replanting activities with youth and community
Establishment of mangrove gallery at primary school
Module development of Translating SDGs through Mangrove Conservation Activities
Size of academic audience: 
500
Results: 
4600 seedlings Planted from September 2018-March 2022
Lessons learned: 
This program provides communities with collaboration opportunities by sharing and exchanging ideas on education on the mangrove ecosystem. Mangrove reforestation activities as an educational tool for the local school children, universities and the public to learn about the mangrove ecosystem and conservation
Key messages: 
This program was held at Mangrove Education Hub, Sungai Batu, Merbok Compartment 11, Hutan Simpan Merbok and aims to raise public awareness, especially among young people, students, and residents, about the importance of maintaining the sustainable ecosystem of mangrove forests. Through this program, participants also experience the “hands-on” activities for mangrove reforestation.
Funding: 
Japan – Malaysia Association (JMA)
School of Educational Studies
RCE Penang, CGSS

Pictures:

File Name Caption for picture Photo Credit
Image icon S.o.m.e.jpg (271.19 KB) Sustainability of Mangrove Ecosystem RCE Penang
Image icon S.o.m.e.jpg (271.19 KB) Sustainability of Mangrove Ecosystem RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.14 (3).jpeg (115.6 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.14 (2).jpeg (99.38 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.14 (1).jpeg (106.15 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.14.jpeg (88.71 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.13 (2).jpeg (87.96 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.40.13 (1).jpeg (89.84 KB) Mangrove Mural Gallery at Haji Omar Tahir Primary School RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.34.25 (1).jpeg (115.88 KB) Mangrove Gallery at Tiram Sungai Merbok Kedah RCE Penang
Image icon WhatsApp Image 2022-09-08 at 10.34.25.jpeg (85.03 KB) Mangrove Gallery at Tiram Sungai Merbok Kedah RCE Penang
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
(https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) and other themes of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)
SDG 1 - End poverty in all its forms everywhere 
Indirect
SDG 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 
Indirect
SDG 3 - Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages 
Indirect
SDG 4 - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 
Direct
SDG 5 - Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 
Indirect
SDG 6 - Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 
Direct
SDG 7 - Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 
Indirect
SDG 8 - Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all 
Indirect
SDG 9 - Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation, and foster innovation 
Indirect
SDG 10 - Reduce inequality within and among countries 
Indirect
SDG 11 - Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 
Indirect
SDG 12 - Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 
Direct
SDG 13 - Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 
Direct
SDG 14 - Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 
Direct
SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss 
Direct
SDG 16 - Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 
Indirect
SDG 17 - Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development 
Direct
Theme
Disaster Risk Reduction 
Indirect
Traditional Knowledge  
Indirect
Agriculture 
Indirect
Arts 
Indirect
Curriculum Development 
Direct
Ecotourism 
Direct
Forests/Trees 
Direct
Plants & Animals 
Direct
Waste 
Indirect
ESD for 2030-Priority Action Areas
Priority Action Area 1 - Advancing policy 
state: 
Indirect
Priority Action Area 2 - Transforming learning and training environments 
state: 
Direct
Priority Action Area 3 - Developing capacities of educators and trainers 
state: 
Direct
Priority Action Area 4 - Mobilizing youth 
state: 
Direct
Priority Action Area 5 - Accelerating sustainable solutions at local level 
state: 
Direct
I acknowledge the above: 
Yes