RCE Thiruvananthapuram - 2018

National Banana Festival
Basic Information
Title of project : 
National Banana Festival
Submitting RCE: 
RCE Thiruvananthapuram
Contributing organization(s) : 
RCE Thiruvananthapuram
Centre for Innovation in Science & Social Action (CISSA)
Focal point(s) and affiliation(s)
Name: 
Centre for Innovation in Science and Social Action (CISSA)
Format of project: 
Power point
Language of project: 
English
Date of submission:
Saturday, February 17, 2018
SDG 4 –Quality Education
At what level is the policy operating?: 
Local
SDG 8- GOOD JOBS AND ECONOMIC GROWTH
At what level is the policy operating?: 
Local
SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption
At what level is the policy operating?: 
Local
Geographical & Education Information
Region: 
Asia-Pacific
Country: 
India
Location(s): 
Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
Address of focal point institution for project: 
Centre for Innovation in Science and Social Action (CISSA)
T.C. 15/510, USRA -55, Udarasiromani Road,
Vellayambalam, Thiruvananthapuram - 695010, Kerala, India
Target Audience:
Socioeconomic and environmental characteristics of the area : 
National banana Festival 2018 held during 17-21 February 2018 at Kalliyoor, Thiruvannathapuram, Kerala, India.
The sprawling ground in Kalliyoor Grama Panchayat, adjacent to the world famous Kovalam beach was the venue. This intensive farming region predominantly cultivating diversified varieties of banana is the home to College of Agriculture under Kerala Agricultural University.
Description of sustainable development challenge(s) in the area the project addresses: 
Bananas have been grown in India from Vedic times. India is considered as one of the centres of diversity and origin of the banana. Banana is referred as “Kalpatharu” (The Divine Tree of Life or Wish Fulfilling Tree) due to its multifaceted uses in food and medicine and this fruit is well referred and reflected in our culture. Auspicious occasions in India always witness the use of banana as offerings to god or as a sacred food.

Bananas and plantains are grown in more than 130 countries across the world and the fourth most important staple crop in the world and are critical for food security in many tropical countries. Banana is popular on global scale not only for its nutritional value but also because of its economic importance especially to smallholding farmers in the developing countries, where lion's share of the production comes from smallholders for local consumption.

India ranks first in global banana production with 18 % of global production and accounts for 36.6 per cent of the total fruit production in the country. Banana and plantain are widely grown in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Orissa, Bihar, eastern U.P., West Bengal, Assam and North eastern states.

The banana industry provides employment for thousands of people. There is no part of the banana that is not used. Banana fibre is one of the strongest natural fibre is used to make fabrics, handicrafts and fashion goods. The commercial value of the fibre has increased over the years. The banana leaf plate is India's answer to plastics and Styrofoam.

National Banana Festival showcased the wide variety of bananas in India and to introduce multifarious uses of this unique fruit. Further, it also illustrates how research can help use banana diversity to increase options for both small-scale farmers and consumers. The festival brought together large numbers of producers, farmers, businessmen, academics and researchers from around the country.

The festival will benefit everyone who has an interest in the banana sector - from producer and consumer organizations to governments, retailers, traders, NGOs and research institutions.

Objectives
- awareness on the need for conservation of local diversity of banana
- awareness on the nutritional and health benefits of bananas
- provide training to banana farmers, entrepreneurs and self help groups on value addition
- promote utilisation of banana by-products such as peels, leaves, pseudostem, stalk and inflorescence for food and non-food products.
- create market linkages: Supply chain and value addition linkages
- promote organic farming, precision farming and efficient input management

Major Components
- National Exhibition
- National Seminar
- Farmers Meet
- Training Programmes
- Documentary shows
- National Photography Competition
- Cultural programmes
- Competitions
Contents
Status: 
Completed
Period: 
February, 2018
Rationale: 
National Banana Festival showcased the wide variety of bananas in India and to introduce multifarious uses of this unique fruit. Further, it also illustrates how research can help use banana diversity to increase options for both small-scale farmers and consumers. The festival brought together large numbers of producers, farmers, businessmen, academics and researchers from around the country.

The festival benefitted everyone who has an interest in the banana sector - from producer and consumer organizations to governments, retailers, traders, NGOs and research institutions.
Objectives: 
- create awareness on the need for conservation of local diversity of banana
- create awareness on the nutritional and health benefits of bananas
- provide training to banana farmers, entrepreneurs and self help groups on value addition
- promote utilisation of banana by-products such as peels, leaves, pseudostem, stalk and inflorescence for food and non-food products.
- create market linkages: Supply chain and value addition linkages
- promote organic farming, precision farming and efficient input management
Activities and/or practices employed: 
National Banana Festival 2018 was organised from 17-21 Feb 2018 at Kalliyoor, Thiruvananthapuram.
Components:
- National Exhibition
- National Seminar
- Farmers Meet
- Training Programmes
- Documentary shows
- National Photography Competition
- Cultural programmes
- Competitions – Cookery, painting & drawing

The three day national seminar of national banana festival 2018 began on February 17 with the paper presentation on the topic ‘conservation and sustainable development of banana systems’ by Dr Ram Boojh, UNESCO South Asia Cluster Officer, New Delhi, India. Presentations on various topics including alternate dimensions for enhancing the banana farmers in India, processing and value addition in banana: a promising enterprise, IP protection over Chengalikodan Nendra banana of Kerala, farm mechanization and mechanization in by-product utilization of banana, deployment of banana tissue culture known-how in rural sector through BARC’s AKRUTI programme, end to end supply chain program for banana Robusta in Mysore region, scope and importance for income and employment generation and Invitro regeneration of Musa Paradisiaca Cv. Cv Rose Poovan(Aa) using inflorescence Apices, were made over the past three days.


Farmers, Self help Groups and women were invited and given training by the agricultural experts.

A Buyer Seller meet was also orgnised in connection with NBF 2018.

Interaction between Farmers and Scientists.

Farmers Meet was organized at Kalliyoor.

Farmers and SHGs showcased their products at the national banana festival exhibition.

A walk into the National Banana Exhibition organised at the Vellayani Temple Ground in Kalliyoor Grama Panchayat as part of the NBF 2018 could amaze all with a dazzling display of a wide ranging varieties of the fruit and the products that can be made from the banana plant. There were about 200 stalls set up by central, state government institutions from almost all regions of the country. There were also NGOs, Self Help Groups and individual farmers keeping their best innovations and harvests on display.

Apart from the fruit varieties, the exhibition also showcased value added products made from the normally unused parts, such as the trunk and fibre, of banana. The exhibition also had on display the various income generating opportunities these products put forth.

Products such as banana wine (in a range of flavours), banana pickle, chocolate, banana health drink, footwear, bags, carpets and mobile pouches made from banana fibre were also on display and for sale.

The home pavilion had different exhibits to establish the awesome diversity, utility and ecological importance of banana plant. There were about 100 varieties of banana fruits on display. All science about banana were palatably communicated to the public in both English and Malayalam languages with the help of 50 vertical panels carrying pithy information about banana
Size of academic audience: 
1000
Results: 
Farmers were finding difficult to sell organic fruits and vegetables at a premium price in the village. To overcome this difficulty, the national banana festival helped to boost their production through various ways.

As part of this festival we also organized a special session of training programmes, cookery competition for the local women. Fortifying the knowledge base, were various training programmes at NBF 2018

A good number of farmer self help groups had showcased their good reaps at the National Banana Exhibition

Hundreds of farmers from different States of the country attended the National Farmers’ Meet held as part of the NBF 2018.

Dedicating the NBF 2018 for the farmers, the National Exhibition was an impelling propaganda upon the skills our farmer community possesses in exploring the merits inherent in the banana farm industry. There were a dazzling display of a variety of banana bunches, banana seedlings, banana products presented by many a number of farmer self-help groups and NGOs. In the expo, the farmers has exhibited their good reaps in a way inspiring for every visitor. Farmers who placed the captivating stock could get them sold out easily, too. There were several training programmes arranged for the benefit of farmers. Impressive numbers of participants were there for such training programmes and each session had effective interaction between farmers and scientists of eminence as well as between experienced farmers and novices.
Lessons learned: 
- With participation of Central & State Ministers, Directors of National Institutes, large number of researchers, farmers and entrepreneurs, the event was successful in bringing national attention to the development of Banana sector in the country.
- Event could attract huge participation of public throughout from morning to late night in all festival days.
- Festival succeeded in establishing network and collaboration among various stake holders.
- About 200 varieties of Banana bunches displayed was an eye opener to the rich diversity of banana in the country and need for conservation and sustainable utilization was conversed effectively
- Large number of papers presented in the seminar from various R & D centres, Agri Universities, and NGOs from all our country helped in updating knowledge in the sector.
- Event could bring out the rich, cultural linkages people have with banana through Poets Meet, Cultural Leaders Meet, Painting Competition, Cookery Competitions etc.
- Many innovative products were exhibited exposing entrepreneurs to the huge potential available in the value addition sector
- The potential in Banana fibre products and fabric sector was displayed through exhibition of diverse products and live demonstration.
- Information about a number of new technologies and research outputs were made available to the public and entrepreneurs.
Key messages: 
Promotion of sustainable development by adopting sustainable means
Relationship to other RCE activities: 
NIL
Funding: 
Funded by Government, non governmental organizations, private institutions

Pictures:

File Name Caption for picture Photo Credit
Image icon photo1.jpg (41.89 KB) Hon’ble Union Minister for Agriculture Shri.Radha Mohan Singh addressing the delegates CISSA
Image icon photo2.jpg (36.47 KB) NBF 2018 educative pavilion on banana- a view of school children CISSA
Image icon photo3.jpg (47.54 KB) Children showing their creative side CISSA
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
(https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) and other themes of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)
SDG 1 - End poverty in all its forms everywhere 
Indirect
SDG 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 
Direct
SDG 3 - Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages 
Indirect
SDG 4 - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 
Direct
SDG 5 - Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 
Direct
SDG 6 - Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 
Indirect
SDG 7 - Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 
Indirect
SDG 8 - Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all 
Direct
SDG 9 - Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation, and foster innovation 
Indirect
SDG 10 - Reduce inequality within and among countries 
Indirect
SDG 11 - Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 
Indirect
SDG 12 - Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 
Direct
SDG 13 - Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 
Direct
SDG 14 - Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 
Indirect
SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss 
Direct
SDG 16 - Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 
Direct
SDG 17 - Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development 
Direct
Theme
Disaster Risk Reduction 
Indirect
Traditional Knowledge  
Direct
Agriculture 
Direct
Arts 
Indirect
Curriculum Development 
Direct
Ecotourism 
Indirect
Forests/Trees 
Indirect
Plants & Animals 
Direct
Waste 
Indirect
Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development – Priority Action Areas
Priority Action Area 1 - Advancing policy 
Indirect
Priority Action Area 2 - Transforming learning and training environments 
Direct
Priority Action Area 3 - Building capacities of educators and trainers 
Direct
Priority Action Area 4 - Empowering and mobilizing youth 
Direct
Priority Action Area 5 - Accelerating sustainable solutions at local level 
Direct