RCE Greater Dhaka - 2019

Location

Bangladesh
BD
Linkages between ecosystem management and resilience to climate impacts and food insecurity
Basic Information
Title of project : 
Linkages between ecosystem management and resilience to climate impacts and food insecurity
Submitting RCE: 
RCE Greater Dhaka
Contributing organization(s) : 
Centre for Global Environmental Culture (CGEC), IUBAT—International University of Business Agriculture and Technology
IUBAT Institute of SDG Studies (IISS)
WWOOF Bangladesh
FEPPCAR
Green Savers Association
Dept of Environmental Engineering of Shahjalal University of Science and Technology
Focal point(s) and affiliation(s)
Name: 
Mohammed Ataur Ataur Rahman
Organizational Affiliation: 
marahman@iubat.edu
Format of project: 
Manuscript
Language of project: 
English
Date of submission:
Sunday, July 21, 2019
Additional resources: 
Dr. Mohamed Behnassi

Researcher & Professor of Global Environmental and Human Security Politics & Law

Faculty of Law, Economics and Social Sciences, Ibn Zohr University | Agadir, Morocco

Founding Director, Research Center for Environment, Human Security & Governance (CERES)

✆ +212-668-466447 | Skype: mbehnassi

behnassi@gmail.com | m.behnassi@uiz.ac.ma
SDGs 1,2,13,14 and 15
At what level is the policy operating?: 
International
Geographical & Education Information
Region: 
Global
Country: 
Morocco
Location(s): 
Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Morocco, France, United Kingdom, Germany, Japan
Address of focal point institution for project: 
4 Embankment Drive Road, Uttara Model Town
Uttara Model Town
Socioeconomic and environmental characteristics of the area : 
Anthropogenic climate change is the most significant threat to global food security, impacting all dimensions of food production, availability, stability and utilisation. Climate change also affects the ability of individuals to access and use food effectively by altering the conditions for food safety and increasing the risks of vector-, water- and food-borne diseases. As a result, it has been projected that the number of undernourished people may increase by up to 26% by 2080. Achieving food security is a critical public policy problem, particularly given the tendency of climate change to interact with other economic, political, temporal and biophysical drivers.
Description of sustainable development challenge(s) in the area the project addresses: 
Climate change has been affecting the agricultural sectors in many ways, and these impacts vary from region to region. For example, climate change is expected to increase temperature and precipitation variability, reduce the predictability of seasonal weather patterns and increase the frequency and intensity of severe weather events, such as floods, cyclones and hurricanes. Some regions are facing prolonged drought and water shortages.
Contents
Status: 
Ongoing
Period: 
March, 2019
Rationale: 
With the advancement of agriculture, urbanization and industrialization human involved in the regulation of the production system to harness the benefits and thus managing the ecosystems. Much progress has been made in reducing hunger and poverty and improving food security and nutrition. But major concerns persist; some 795 million people still suffer from hunger and more than two billion from micronutrient deficiencies or forms of over nourishment. In addition, global food security could be in jeopardy, due to mounting pressures on natural resources and to climate change, both of which threaten the sustainability of food systems at large Still, there are many ecological systems are beyond the control of human being but many systems are over-explored and highly-intervened. The well-being of people all over the world depends on healthy ecosystems to provide goods, like food and water, and services like climate regulation and protection from natural hazards
Objectives: 
So there needs a guideline or controlling over the human activities to keep the ecosystems functional and productive. Since the net impact of a climatic shock on food security depends not only on the intensity of the shock but also on the vulnerability of the food system to the particular shock. With the increased population human faces insecure to sufficient amounts of safe and nutritious food for normal growth and development and active and healthy life. Food security vulnerability due to climate change is the propensity of the food system to be unable to deliver food security outcomes under climate change. Therefore, this guideline will be very effective to save the ecosystems for a productive one to secure the food
Activities and/or practices employed: 
A synthesis of published and authentic data/information compilation emphasizing the importance of the global changes towards producing a handbook
Size of academic audience: 
Its a global projects expected more than 100,000 learners
Results: 
The final version is under review expecting by the end of the year
Lessons learned: 
Importance of Ecosystem in Food Production, its vulnerability to climate change, adaptation practices in climate change situation towards food security
Key messages: 
Ecosystem management is a key to restore the hydrological cycle to boost up food production and to bring resilience to climate impacts and food insecurity



Relationship to other RCE activities: 
RCE Collaborative activities and Global Working Group on Global Climate Change on Food Security and Resilience:
Initiated by Professor Mohamed Benhassi of Morocco, coordinated other countries like Sri Lanka, India, France, UK, Japan and Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, we coordinated with our partners and produced the synthesis write up
Funding: 
Research Center for Environment, Human Security & Governance (CERES), Morrocco
International Research Department (IRD), France
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
(https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) and other themes of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)
SDG 1 - End poverty in all its forms everywhere 
Direct
SDG 2 - End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture 
Direct
SDG 3 - Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages 
Direct
SDG 4 - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 
Indirect
SDG 5 - Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 
Indirect
SDG 6 - Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 
Direct
SDG 7 - Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 
Indirect
SDG 8 - Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all 
Indirect
SDG 9 - Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation, and foster innovation 
Indirect
SDG 10 - Reduce inequality within and among countries 
Indirect
SDG 11 - Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 
Indirect
SDG 12 - Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 
Indirect
SDG 13 - Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 
Direct
SDG 14 - Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 
Direct
SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss 
Direct
SDG 16 - Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 
Indirect
SDG 17 - Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development 
Direct
Theme
Disaster Risk Reduction 
Direct
Traditional Knowledge  
Direct
Agriculture 
Direct
Arts 
Indirect
Curriculum Development 
Indirect
Ecotourism 
Indirect
Forests/Trees 
Direct
Plants & Animals 
Direct
Waste 
Direct
Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development – Priority Action Areas
Priority Action Area 1 - Advancing policy 
Direct
Priority Action Area 2 - Transforming learning and training environments 
Direct
Priority Action Area 3 - Building capacities of educators and trainers 
Indirect
Priority Action Area 4 - Empowering and mobilizing youth 
Indirect
Priority Action Area 5 - Accelerating sustainable solutions at local level 
Direct