RCE Yogyakarta - 2018

Water Exploration and Conservation with Renewable Energy to Accomplish Sustainable Water Supply in Gunung Kidul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Basic Information
Title of project : 
Water Exploration and Conservation with Renewable Energy to Accomplish Sustainable Water Supply in Gunung Kidul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Submitting RCE: 
RCE Yogyakarta
Contributing organization(s) : 
RCE Yogyakarta, Directorate of Community Services Universitas Gadjah Mada, Organisasi Kelola Air Mandiri (OKAM) & Baladewi Wonosadi (Local Community).
Focal point(s) and affiliation(s)
Name: 
Local Government of Gunungkidul
Organizational Affiliation: 
Province Government of Yogyakarta, Minister of Public Works, Republic of Indonesia
Format of project: 
Powerpoint
Language of project: 
English
Date of submission:
Additional resources: 
http://pengabdian.ugm.ac.id/rce/
Geographical & Education Information
Region: 
Asia-Pacific
Country: 
Indonesia
Location(s): 
Gunungkidul District, Spesial Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Address of focal point institution for project: 
Directorate Community Services, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Jl. Pancasila Blok G7 Bulaksumur Yogyakarta Indonesia 55281
Target Audience:
Socioeconomic and environmental characteristics of the area : 
Gunung Kidul Regency is a carst ecosystem area with its size of 1,405 km2 and its average rainfall of 2000 mm. This limestone parent material contains many porous that cause rainwater to leak quickly into the ground through infiltration and percolation processes without keeping the water remain on the surface for a longer time. Therefore, this region lacks water supply every year. This condition requires technological innovation to ensure the availability of water supply in the region. There are two places that have special characteristics in the areas mentioned. In the southern part, it has potential water resources in the form of groundwater with its debit from 40 up to 200 liters per second. Based on a survey in 2006 (Student Community Services-Community Empowerment Learning UGM), there are 40 species of the trees that are able to adapt to the karst ecosystem in Wonosadi forest, Nglipar, and they have been sustainably taken care of by the local community. At least 20 big trees needed to maintain one spring. If this local wisdom of Wonosadi communities can be used as a forest management model for the creation of policymaking in the context of water conservation, this can be an alternative solution to preserve water supply in the northern part of Gunung Kidul. In addition, this program is also aimed to conserve adjacent hills that are closed to the area by practicing community empowerment.
Description of sustainable development challenge(s) in the area the project addresses: 
There are various factors that have driven the Groundwater exploration and conservation in The Gunung Kidul Regency. The main factor is a long dry-season that has plagued the Gunung Kidul regency. This caused more than 130 thousand people living in the areas having serious difficulties to get clean water (Kedaulatan Rakyat, 13th December 2005). It is admitted that the lack of water supply has been one of the main causes of people suffering. The consequences of drought have been widely known by the local people. They have to find drinking water from another place such as a lake or pond by walking up to 5 km away from home. Communities may be able to get for the water subsidies from the government, but in many cases, this is not sufficient to meet the people demands. As result, this high demand of water has created an opportunity for private sectors to take benefit. For example, as can be seen at Gunung Sewu area, the cost of clean water per tank is Rp. 100.000 up to Rp. 120.000, and this is only enough to meet the people demands of water for two weeks. A few quantity of surface water available in Gunung Kidul is not due to infrequent raining but more because of the limestone geological factor. It has been mentioned earlier that the limestone parent material contains many porous that cause rainwater to leak quickly into the ground through infiltration and percolation processes without keeping the water remain in the surface for a longer time. Even though it is only a small fraction of rainwater that infiltrates the ground, but the total amount of groundwater is exceeding the amount of surface water. The figures based on the various researches conducted since the 1980s suggest that the amount of clean water (around 8.000-10.000 litre per-second) can be found in the Gunung Kidul’s caves.
Contents
Status: 
Completed
Period: 
January, 2006 to August, 2018
Rationale: 
This project applies the use of renewable energy by using solar cell technology and adjusting the technology of water uplifting among the populations. How can this project catalyze the involvement of stakeholders and public support? As water has been the primary needs of population, and given that the project is offering the ease of getting clean water and ensuring the sustainability of water supply for their needs, this necessarily explains their support and involvement. This project involves the student’s participation under the program of Student Community Services (called KKN UGM) that has long experienced in mobilizing and organizing the intellectual resources in dealing with the problems of communities. KKN UGM has been well organized and regularly run by the University since the 1970s. In addition, the students who are joining the KKN will also be provided by the University supervisor with adequate training and skills in dealing with specific tasks.
The main achievements and lesson of this project can encourage leadership and the character building among the student and local people, besides, enhance the quality of community development and institutional building.
Objectives: 
Objectives :
a. Water exploration in the Plawan Cave to meet water requirement for the community
b. Water distribution from the main reservoir to the smaller reservoirs in each sub-village
c. Improve social welfare through integrated training for small enterprises
d. Water conservation through reforestation using local conservatory tree
e. Environmental education for the local people on conservation strategy
f. Local community awareness, support, and involvement in the groundwater conservation project
g. Local community sense of belonging to the water conservation
h. Environmental awareness of local people on biodiversity protection
i. Transferability of environmental awareness and local wisdom intergeneration
Activities and/or practices employed: 
Following the observation, SCS-CEL students with cooperation from residents started the construction of underground pipes which is then accompanied by on ground pipe construction. These pipes will be usefull to transport water supply from the underground spring to a reservoir on the ground, before being distributed to each house. A hybrid power plant was built for the pumping system. In it was an electrical generator with 55 Kva power, and solar panels with photo-voltaic module, accumulator, inverter, and a direct-coupling system or storage. To ensure a sustainable supply of water, on the ground reservoir was built with a capacity of 60 m3. Water stored in the reservoir will be able to be distributed to 7 villages supported by 26 outlet points.
After the water supply was ensured, a problem of management arise. SCS-CEL students held countless lobbying and meeting with residents of seven village community to form a “Water Supply Management Board”. The first step was identification and recognition on local problem and potency which is then continued by the forming of a water management organization. Students coming from law faculty also helped in determining legal status for the organization. To ensure the wellbeing of the operation, training on management and water supply operation was also held several times.
Size of academic audience: 
More than 200 persons
Results: 
After the water supply was ensured, a problem of management arise. SCS-CEL students held countless lobbying and meeting with residents of seven village community to form a “Water Supply Management Board”. The first step was identification and recognition on local problem and potency which is then continued by the forming of a water management organization. Students coming from law faculty also helped in determining legal status for the organization
Lessons learned: 
The main achievements and lesson of this project can encourage leadership and the character building among the student and local people, besides enhancing the quality of community development and institutional building, and the main goal of this project is directed to enhance environment condition by ensuring water conservation in a sustainable way, and by doing so it should be able to improve the socio-economic condition of the population.
Funding: 
Ministry of Public Works: it has obligation to start the project (by supplying a deep good water pump, however, it doesn’t support enough funding for water distribution). This is a common policy from the government, stated as community empowerment concept, to share responsibility with the community for contributing to the local development.
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
(https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) and other themes of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)
SDG 1 - End poverty in all its forms everywhere 
Direct
SDG 3 - Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages 
Direct
SDG 4 - Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 
Direct
SDG 6 - Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 
Direct
SDG 7 - Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 
Direct
SDG 8 - Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all 
Direct
SDG 12 - Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 
Direct
SDG 13 - Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 
Direct
SDG 15 - Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss 
Direct
Theme
Agriculture 
Direct
Forests/Trees 
Direct
Plants & Animals 
Direct
Waste 
Direct
Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development – Priority Action Areas
Priority Action Area 1 - Advancing policy 
Direct
Priority Action Area 2 - Transforming learning and training environments 
Direct
Priority Action Area 4 - Empowering and mobilizing youth 
Direct
Priority Action Area 5 - Accelerating sustainable solutions at local level 
Direct